Oakdale Crossing, Raven Wing, Raven Point – 2017 Real Estate Review

Oakdale Crossing, Raven Wing, Raven Point – 2017 Real Estate Review

The Oakdale Crossing, Raven Wing and Raven Pointe neighborhoods had a good 2017 in real estate. All three neighborhoods show year over year improvement in sales numbers, distressed property sales and average sales price. They also show a drop in distressed properties (short sales and foreclosures). The five-year sales have increased over 32% from 2013, but the years between 2013 and 2017 were a roller coaster. In every area, these neighborhoods have been up and down.

Oakdale Crossing, Raven Wing, Raven Point: The ups and downs of the past 5 years.

In 2017, total sales for the three neighborhoods were 37. That was a 131% increaseOakdale Crossing, RavenWing, Raven Point - 2017 Real Estate Review over 2016. Ironically, 2016 saw a -40% drop in sales over 2015, but 2015 saw a 23% increase in sales over 2014. Finally, 2014 was down -21% over 2013, and 2013 was down -21% over 2012. The numbers could give you whiplash if you were a seller in these three neighborhoods.

In the current breakdown, Oakdale Crossing had 6 sales, Raven Wing had 17 sales and Raven Pointe had 14 sales. Raven Wing has consistently carried the most sales from 2013-2017. On average, Raven Wing has double-digit sales compared to its immediate neighbors. Raven Pointe rose to 14 in 2017, but it has been below 8 for the past five years. Oakdale Crossing is typically in single digits with 2017 being the highest in the past five years.

Oakdale Crossing, Raven Wing, Raven Point: What’s in a day

Oakdale Crossing, RavenWing, Raven Point - 2017 Real Estate ReviewAnother way to see how the market has improved over the past five years is to look at the days on the market. The average days on the market can be a very revealing number, or it can yield nothing of valuable to the understanding of a neighborhood’s health.

In these three neighborhoods, this is one number that tells the story of the roller coaster ride these neighborhoods have been on over the past five years. The market of 2013 was the first year where real change was noticeable after the down days of the 2008 recession. It was also the lowest days on the market of the past five years. The 2017 days on the market was the lowest since 2013. At 75 average days on the market, it was 15% below 2016, 13% below 2015, 61% below 2014, and 23% above 2013. Again, there was volatility, but these numbers show a market fighting to get back to a healthy norm.

Oakdale Crossing, Raven Wing, Raven Point: Price change

Price change, up or down, can also show a market’s health. The price change in these three neighborhoods has shown the same pattern as the numbers above. The 2013 average home sale was $377,721. That was 8.5% increase over 2012. In 2014, the average sale price was $404,864, but 2013 dropped to $391,483 and 2015 dropped even further at $377,517. The biggest price change happened in 2017. In 2017, the average home sale was $436,964. That is a 16% increase over 2013 and a 16% increase over 2016.

When the numbers are looked at from a distance, it truly has been a roller coaster ride for the past five years. The thing that separates 2017 from earlier years is that all numbers are up except days on the market. That one number is the least important because there are so many factors that can increase or decrease that number, and those factors may not be related to market health.

For instance, a home that is overpriced will take longer to sell. A home that is hard to show will take longer to sell. A home that is in poor condition will take longer and a home that is plain vanilla in a sea of banana splits may take longer to sell. There are so many factors that can lengthen days on the market that it becomes the lessor of the market health parameters.

When you’re ready to buy or sell in any of these three neighborhoods, give Mike Cooper at Cornerstone Business Group, Inc., a call. Mike and Cornerstone are your local real estate sales pros in Oakdale Crossing, Raven Wing and Raven Pointe.

You may also enjoy these previous reports on these neighborhoods and the local market. 

Oakdale Crossing is on the bright side of the economic recovery.

Winchester-Frederick Co., VA Real Estate Market in Review – 2017

Should I list my home in the Winter months?

Advertisements

What’s a good home-buying timeline?

What’s a good home-buying timeline?

When you’re buying a home, there is a timeline of events that will happen. So, what’s a good home-buying timeline? On rare occasions, you may get the itch to buy a home, and start and close in 30 days. That is not the norm. From the time you have a need to buy a home until you close, you’re most likely looking at 45 days or more. What’s the time-line?

What’s a good home-buying timeline?

  • Financial – Pre-approval
  • Realtor Search
  • Home Search
  • Contract
  • Home Inspection
  • Appraisal
  • Contact Insurance Provider
  • Financing Approval
  • Title Search and Document Preparation
  • Closing Date Set
  • Closing Document Review
  • Contact Utilities
  • Confirm That Funds Are Wired to the Closer
  • Closing

What's a good home-buying timeline?

What’s a good home-buying timeline? – Finance & Realtor Search

Get your pre-qualification or pre-approval letter first. It is always better to have a pre-approval letter, but a pre-qualification letter is better than nothing. This is the first step on your timeline. Getting your financial abilities clearly spelled out will let everyone involved know what to look for when you’re buying a home. Do this about 45-60 days before you hope to close on a home.

Call a Realtor. Actually, call a few Realtors. Interview agents until you find one that works well with your personality and goals. Don’t be shocked if they ask you to sign a buyer broker agreement. A BBA is the equal to a listing agreement when selling a home. In the state of Virginia (7.1.2012), it is required for all buyer-agent relationships. The length of the agreement is negotiable. If you are uncomfortable signing one, ask that the length of the agreement be short (30 day, 60 days, etc.). Find an agent who has your best interest at heart, sign your BBA and get ready to get started.

What’s a good home-buying timeline? – Home Search & Contract

Once you’ve been pre-approved and you’ve located a good Realtor, it’s time to settle on your home criteria and hit the streets. Eliminate as many possibilities in the Realtor’s office before setting appointments. Volume of showings is not the quickest path to the perfect home. Matching criteria with available properties is where you should start your search.

Once you’ve found your perfect home, negotiate an acceptable deal and write a contract. This is where you Realtor will be a priceless addition to your home search. Your Realtor can show you what has sold in your chosen neighborhood.

If you’re planning on offering 50% less than the list price, your Realtor can help you see if there is any possibility of your contract being accepted. The information in the multiple listing service will tell you if homes are selling at list, 1% below list or 50% below list. If they are selling at list or 1% below list, you’re 50% below will not have a chance and you’ve just wasted your time and your Realtor’s time.

This is especially critical in a competitive market. If inventory is low, you can’t afford to make useless offers if you really want the property. Make your best offer and let the seller negotiate if there are needed changes.

What’s a good home-buying timeline? – Home Inspection & Appraisal

Once you have a ratified (accepted) offer, you need to schedule a home inspection (10-14 days, $300-$450 paid out-of-pocket up front). Home inspections look at a home to see if the systems (plumbing, electrical and heating & cooling), roof, appliances and construction are in good working order. If they aren’t, you can walk away, negotiate repairs or accept the property as is. Home inspectors and home inspections are perfect, but they do give a glimpse into the home’s health.

Around the same time, your lender will call for an appraisal (14-21 days on average, and around $450-$650, often paid up front, and out-of-pocket). It’s good to have the home inspection and any negotiations done before the appraisal just in the event the deal falls apart at that point. There’s no sense in paying for an appraisal on a home you will not be buying.

What’s a good home-buying timeline? – Insurance & Financing Approval

Now that the home inspection repairs are agreed to, and possibly complete, you will want to contact your insurance provider to make them aware that you are buying a home and you will need insurance (14-21 days). You may want to shop around to make sure you’re getting the best deal. Prices can vary radically.

Around 21-28 days, you should have a loan approval from your lender. It may take longer, but that is something that should be inserted into the contract. Most lenders can give a loan approval in this amount of time or less, unless there are circumstances that need to be reconciled before that phase can be complete.

What’s a good home-buying timeline? – Title Search & Closing Date Set

Your closing attorney, or closing agent, will be searching your title during this time (14-28 days). The attorney, or agent will be looking for any anomalies in your title’s history. Most will searches will go back at least 60 years to see if the property has had a clear chain of title as it has passed from seller to buyer.

Once the closer has confirmed that the title is clean and can be transferred, a closing date is set. This date should coincide with a date set in the contract. Most contract language says, “On or before” a certain date. That means you may close early if everything is complete and everyone can close early. On occasion, you may close late because something wasn’t completed in time. In that case, you’ll need to have an agreed upon addendum signed by all parties extending the closing date. Those are not as common, and they are normally just a few days or weeks long.

What’s a good home-buying timeline? – Review Closing Docs & Contact Utility Companies to Have Services Set Up.

The closing docs, or CD (for a loan funded sale) needs to be in your hands 3 days before closing. All parties (including lenders) will need to agree to the CD and sign off on the numbers. If there are mistakes on the CD, it will need to be corrected and the 3 day period restarts.

This is a good time to have your utilities set up with your new water, electric, gas, oil, Internet and cable providers. Make sure they are set to start the day of closing. This should be done a week or two before closing. That gives you plenty of time to run around making deposits and filling out applications. This is not something you want to put off to the day of closing. A lot of sellers will have their utilities set to expire on the day of closing. Make sure to put it on your calendar.

What’s a good home-buying timeline? – Confirm That the Funds From Your Lender Are Wired to Your Closing Agent on or Before the Day of Closing & Close.

Make sure the wiring instructions for sending money is handled by you and your closing attorney or agent. Do not send money based on an email received at the last-minute without talking directly to your funding lender. Do not click on a link in a last-minute email offering wiring instructions. A recent real estate scam has been for a thief to send an email with wiring instructions that go to a scam account. It can be devastating. Make sure you and your closing company are monitoring this phase closely, and always talk directly to the people you’ve been working with. This not a time for new names to be added to the contact list.

The last timeline issue is to close. You will meet your closer and sign a one inch pile of papers that are redundant and confusing, but hopefully you’ve picked a closer who will explain everything clearly and with a bit of humor. It can be really boring at this point, and the humor goes a long way. This is an area where having a great Realtor can be a huge plus. Your Realtor can give good recommendations of highly skilled home inspectors, lenders, closing companies and other services.

There is one final conclusion to your process. You get the keys. Congratulations on your home purchase. When you’re ready to start your own timeline, give Mike Cooper, or any of the agents at Cornerstone Business Group, Inc. a call. We are your local real estate sales pros, and we’ll get you across the finish line (hopefully, with a smile).

 

 

 

Should I list my home in the Winter months?

Should I list my home in the Winter months?

Should I list my home in the Winter months? Absolutely! There is a mistaken idea that homes sell better in warmer months, but there is plenty of evidence that homes sell at anytime, but Winter has some advantages that other months may not have.

Realtytrac’s longitudinal study of when is the best time to buy a home found that October is the best month followed by February, July, December and January. Four out of five of the top months are Fall or Winter months. The best day of the week to buy a home is Monday, and October 8th is the best day of the year. That one study blows a huge hole in the “Spring is the best time to list” theory.

Should I list my home in the Winter months? Why?: Inventory is lower

For one, inventory tends to be lower in the cold months. That gives a seller more Should I list my home in the Winter months?visibility because competition is lower. The current Winchester-Frederick County, VA market only has 270 previously owned homes on the market. The market typically has 500-600. The current inventory makes great homes fly off the market.

Think about what low inventory means to a home seller. When the competition is lower, a home seller has more opportunity to make a greater profit on a home sale. Buyers will pay more for a home they fall in love with when there are fewer homes to compare it to. Low inventory, means higher sale prices and quicker sales.

Should I list my home in the Winter months? Why?: Fewer showings

Buyers tend to look at fewer homes in the Winter months. It’s dark early. It can be cold outside (depending on your market). There are fewer homes in their criteria list. Our company has more buyers who buy the first home they see in the Winter months. Why? Because buyers have done their homework before looking at homes. When the inventory is up and the sun is up and the curiosity of buyers is up, they will shop and shop and shop.

In the Summer, a buyer may look at a dozen homes before settling on a home to make an offer on. In the Winter, the process is much faster and the buyer moves more quickly. Therefore, a seller will have fewer people passing through the listed home.

Should I list my home in the Winter months? Why?: Curb appeal is curbed (a little)

If you have kept your yard and home in good shape throughout the year, the Winter months may give you a bit of a respite from all the exterior maintenance. You’re not mowing (again, depending on your market) as much, if any. You’re not trimming hedges as much. Once any leaves are off the lawn, you are pretty well set for the season.

Should I list my home in the Winter months? Why?: Holiday fare may be a plus (but not always)

There is something endearing about a beautifully decorated home during the Winter months. When a buyer comes into a home that is welcoming and cozy, there is a sense of ease and comfort that comes with that. A warm environment, accent lighting, tasteful decorations and a sense of comfort gives buyers the ability to see themselves living in the home.

Don’t be afraid of a Winter listing. The general school of thought is that Spring is the time to list because it’s warmer, it’s lighter longer and more homes are coming on the market. All of those things are true, but the competition is also greater, and with an increase in inventory, there will be a far more showings and more competitive bidding on home prices. Winter has advantages over these issues.

There are many more reasons to list your Virginia or West Virginia home in the cooler months, but you get the idea. Every season has some advantages, and Winter is no different. When you’re ready to sell your Virginia home, give Cornerstone Business Group, Inc., a call. We are your local real estate sales pros.

 

 

What changes can I make to get more money for my home at resale?

What changes can I make to get more money for my home at resale?

If there is one question I hear from home sellers over and over it is, “What changes can What changes can I make to get more money for my home at resale?I make to get more money for my home at resale?” I’ve had some say they were going to add a pool, do a major kitchen remodel, completely gut and remodel a bath, and I always say, “STOP!”

You definitely don’t want to add a pool. There is a narrow market of home-buyers who would want a pool. If you’re going to do a major kitchen remodel, do that while you live there so you can enjoy it, and why would you want to do a radical bath remodel? What is wrong with the current bath? Here again, if it needs a remodel, do it while you’re there and can enjoy it.

What changes can I make to get more money for my home? Minor remodeling gives more bang for the buck.

The kitchen

Minor remodeling of some of the key areas can give more bang for the buck much of the time. Paint, flooring and good lighting can make a major difference in a bath or kitchen. Painting kitchen cabinets can bring them new life, and that has become a thing today. Rather than a $50,000 cabinet replacement, a couple cans of paint and a little patience can go a long way.

Counter-tops are always a plus, but granite counters can run into the thousands quickly, and you may not recoup your costs. Also, granite is porous and can collect permanent stains. A less expensive alternative (not radically less) is quartz. Quartz will not hold on to stains like granite, but it will give the same appeal.

The bathrooms

The bathrooms are another buyer hot-spot. If the bath appliances are dated, you may want to have them replaced, re-glaized or have them repaired. There are companies that can place a cover over an outdated pink tub and make it look brand new. It’s a less expensive option and it accomplishes the same goal. You can also pick up new bath appliances at Habitat for Humanity Restores for a song.

Simple things like a new sink, toilet, toilet seat, towel racks, light fixtures and even a great shower curtain can make a bath look completely different. Paint and flooring are always a plus. Always make sure the caulk around the shower, sink and toilet are fresh and clean. Simple changes can give an 80%-100% return on your efforts.

What changes can I make to get more money for my home? Throughout the house

There are a few areas that improve your homes appeal with a small investment.

  • New lighting – Consider LED rings for recessed lights, and swap out other light bulbs with more efficient whiter light LED bulbs.
  • New flooring – replace worn and stained carpet.
  • Hardwoods – if you have worn hardwood floors, having them sanded can add a lot of appeal to buyers.
  • Keep everything clean and put away – it makes the house look larger when it is not wall to wall stuff.
  • Make sure the windows can let the light in. Light is your friend.
  • Paint the walls with a neutral color.
  • Better insulation (one of the highest returns)

What changes can I make to get more money for my home? Outside

Curb appeal is always a good thing to concentrate on when preparing your home for sale. Landscaping is an inexpensive plus. Make sure your mulch is fresh and spread What changes can I make to get more money for my home at resale?well. Add a pop of color throughout the flower beds and keep the flower beds weeded throughout the sale period.

Another often overlooked option is the front door. Bankrate.com rates a new entry door as a 90.7% return on the investment. That’s a pretty good return if it causes your home to sell, and it can make a great first impression to your entry.

What changes can I make to get more money for my home? What doesn’t return the most money?

  • A major kitchen remodel
  • A basement remodel
  • A family room remodel
  • A major bath remodel
  • An addition
  • New Windows – lower sale return, but a good investment if you’re going to live there.

These are all things that will make the home more enjoyable while you live there, but if you’re doing them to increase your home’s value for resale, you may be giving money away. For instance, a family room addition may not return more than 69% of your investment. A basement remodel is nearly the same at 70%.

Spend your money where you can get the most for the effort and you will be sure to walk way from the closing table happy. Sometimes, less really is more. Always make sure you do your homework before selling your home and find out  where the best return is for the sale. When you’re ready to sell your home, give Cornerstone Business Group, Inc., a call. We are your local real estate sales pros.