Canter Estates, Stephens City, VA – Real Estate Year in Review – 2018

Canter Estates, Stephens City, VA – Real Estate Year in Review – 2018

Canter Estates, Stephens City, VA had a very good real estate year in 2018. The highly Canter Estates, Stephens City, VA - Real Estate Year in Review - 2018desirable community of homes had a 6.6% sales rate for the 2018 market year. The number of 2018 sales were a 16% increase over 2017. Ironically, 2018 was a -15% over 2016.

As the local markets began to heal from the 2008 recession, the percentage of change was all over the map. The 2018 market sales were 93% higher than 2015, but they were even higher over 2014. The percentage change over 2014 was 107%. That’s a pretty good sign of where the market was, and where it is today.

Canter Estates, Stephens City, VA: 2018 Sales by the Month.

I’m asked every year, “When is the best time to list my home.” My answer is basically, when you’re ready. Buyers buy all year-long. Let me show you what I mean. In Canter Estates, home sales have been consistent throughout the year.

As a matter of fact, home sale have done better in most cooler to cold months than in Canter Estates, Stephens City, VA - Real Estate Year in Review - 2018the warmer to hot months. Of the 29 sales, January, February, March and October made up 13 sales. That means 45% of total sales took place in the cooler to cold months. That blows a hole in the “list in the Spring because that is the best time to sell” theory. To be fair, April was also a very good month with 4 sales. If you add April to our list, those five months made up 59% of total sales. The warm months made up 38% of total sales for 2018.

Canter Estates, Stephens City, VA: Distressed Sales

Distressed sales still managed to show up in Canter Estates in 2018, but they were minor in comparison to the dog days of the recession. They did manage to be 6.9% of total sales. That number sounds huge until you learn that it was 2 out of 29 sales. That number does not show a trend or offer any form of caution about the future in Canter Estates.

Canter Estates, Stephens City, VA: Average Sales Price

The average home sale price in Canter Estates was $353,921. That was for a four bedroom – 3 bath (2.5 in most cases) home. For those considering a sale in the near to immediate future, that equates to $139.25 per square foot of value in your home. That number can help you learn what your home may sell for.

The average days on the market for a Canter Estates home was 60 days. Days on the market is an outlier number for most market updates. It can mean something, and it can mean absolutely nothing. There are so many factors that cause days on the market to be high or low that it is hard to use it as a precursor to a sale price.

A home can be priced to high, and it lingers on the market. A house can be in a less desirable place, and the days can add. A neighbor may have a barking dog that keeps a home in the market. A section of a street may have a high volume of teenagers who shoot basketball at all hours of the day and night. There are so many things that can influence days on the market that it is hard to use it when making an offer on a home.

The best advice for listing a home is to price it right, make sure it’s in great condition, keep it ready to show all the time, and trust the agent you hired to sell it. When you’re ready to sell your Canter Estates home, call me at Cornerstone Business Group, Inc., and I’ll put my decades of experience, my technological skills and my market understanding to work for you. Let’s have a great 2019 in Canter Estates.

 

Advertisements

4 Things every home-buyer should know before buying a home.

There are a number of things every home-buyer should know before buying a home. There is no sense getting excited over a home purchase without covering all of your bases first. So, let’s get started.

Home-buyer rule 1

Every home-buyer needs to know what they can spend before contacting a Realtor. That means, drop by a lenders office first. I just had a buyer find a house, put an offer in, give an EMD and do a home inspection. Then, I received a note from the lender who had given me a pre-qualification letter 45 days earlier, telling me the buyer wasn’t actually qualified.

Buyers, check your own credit. Go to a reputable lender and have them qualify you. Better yet, get them to pre-approve you. In my case, the lender’s incompetence allowed this buyer to go way too far into the process before realizing the mistake. It cost the buyers money, the Realtor time and money and the sellers time off the market. Check and double-check.

Home-buyer rule 2

Don’t change your credit report in any way other than positive ways. Once you start the home-buying process, stop using credit. Pay your bills on time and don’t add any more debt. Don’t open up any new credit accounts, don’t buy new furniture for your new house, don’t buy a car and don’t take time off of work before closing. Freeze in place. You want your credit report to look better just before closing, and your lender will pull your credit right before closing.

Home-buyer rule 3

Make sure you hire a Realtor who can make things happen. I just had an agent who was too green to be out on her own. She sent an offer to purchase agreement 6 times in 5 days before she got one right. She also missed that they property was being sold “as-is” in the listing. Her clients had a home inspection, which is perfectly fine, but there is a better than average change the seller isn’t going to do anything. When she submitted her 3 pages of repair requests, I had to reminder her that the house was being sold as-is. She was dumbfounded.

Her home-buyer spent money for the report, and again, it’s fine to do them for information purposes when a home is listed as-is, but there is no sense in asking the seller to fix things when he has already made it public knowledge that he will not. Pick someone with a proven track record and negotiation skills. This agent had neither, and it costs her clients money, the home and the seller time off the market.

Home-buyer rule 4

Use the Internet to find your dream home before calling your agent. No agent in any community knows every home in the community. You can glean much information on the Internet before calling your agent. Drive by the properties that interest you and once you’ve settled on an area, home style and price range, then have your Realtor confirm the status of the homes and go shopping. Your agent can set up an automatic update for you that will add to your own efforts. Spend the majority of your time looking at homes online before looking at them in person. You can cut a lot of homes that aren’t right for you this way.

When you’re ready to make the leap into home-ownership, give Cornerstone Business Group, Inc., a call. We are your neighborhood real estate sales pros.

Do’s and Don’ts When Financing a Home

Do’s and Don’ts When Financing a Home

There are some do’s and don’ts when financing a home purchase that you’ll want to abide by to make the process as painless and simple as possible. Buying a home is not complicated if you have a great Realtor, a solid lender and a talented closing agent, but if you do a few unconscious things, it can be like being dragged over broken glass. Let me show you how to avoid that experience.

Don’t – Don’t do anything that will affect your credit report negatively.

Let’s start with the most common and most unconscious mistake home-buyers make. Do's and Don'ts When Financing a HomeDon’t charge anything, buy anything on credit or skip credit payments. That may sound like commonsense, but in the excitement of the moment, some home-buyers will go out and buy new furniture on credit. After all, the local furniture store is having a great sale that will be over before closing, right? Wrong!

Don’t do it. Just say no. Do whatever it takes to keep you from using credit, creating new accounts or expanding your current debt. Lenders will pull your credit when you start the process of buying a home. They will also pull it right before closing. If there are changes, it may, and probably will affect your ability to purchase a home.

Sadly, I just had a wonderful couple who finally found the right home. They could afford it, and it was in a great place. They wrote a solid offer, it was accepted, they were able to get some closing cost help and the seller was willing to do a number of home inspection repairs. Their first home purchase looked like it was finally going to happen. Then they bought a car. Their lender didn’t have the “don’t add debt” chat with them before the sought my help. They never mentioned it to me. I wish they had.

The car purchase torpedoed everything. They were declined their loan. They lost the money they had spent on the home inspection and appraisal and it could have been avoided. I like to say, “Freeze in place.” Financing a home has a very specific criteria that a home-buyer should adhere to, and if they don’t, they will fail like my clients.

Do – Pay your debts.

Pay your debts on time, every time. Pay off as many debts as possible and reasonable. Make sure you keep enough money in your accounts to close on your real estate purchase. This is not the time to play debt roulette. You can’t ignore any bill prior to the financing approval and closing. Stay on course

Don’t – Don’t move money around 

This is a new one for me. I recently had a client who regularly moved money between accounts. If one account had a boost of .25 % interest, the money would be moved there. In the same way, if another one went up .125% in a week, the money was moved there. If the rate dropped on one account, money was moved from that one and invested somewhere else.

In the case, the lender had a hard time keeping up with this buyer’s money. The rotating money wheel nearly caused the buyer to lose the home purchase. The money is there, somewhere, but the constant movement made lenders nervous.

Do – Freeze in place

This is another place where keeping things simple is critical. Don’t move money. Don’t make huge deposits unless you talk to your lender first. The lender will always want to know where the money is coming from. Is it borrowed from someone, or is it a gift? Is it from a closed insurance policy? Where is it coming from? Here again, freeze in place. Keep everything as simple as possible.

There are always things your lender will instruct you to do when you are financing a home. Make sure to listen and follow instructions. You don’t want to add unnecessary stress to your home purchase. Keep it simple.